“YOLO”

You only live once.
Achieve your dreams.
Cherish the ones you love.
Make omens to heal.
Plan vacations that you WILL take, no matter how extravagant.
Hold on to family roots.
Break down doubt.
Mend broken promises.
Follow your spirit.
You only live once, so live.


Showcase features local authors

Will Patterson A&E EDITOR The University of Nebraska at Omaha Bookstore and Criss library are giving local authors a chance to step into the spotlight with...

‘ The Dovekeepers’: an inspiring read

Alice Hoffman's novel  "The Dovekeepers" is a terrific, inspiring novel. It is also very complex, which makes it a bit harder to read compared to the common teen novel.


10 reasons to read a book

While packing up The Gateway office,  I came across a red and white bookmark that made me smile. On one side was a list of...

Sarah Mckinstry-Brown: Cradling Monsoons

Sarah Mckinstry-Brown is a poet, mother and wife.  She is one woman balancing a monsoon of tasks. Mckinstry-Brown explained that life's gifts and blessings can become cumbersome, such is the nature of life.  This is the inspiration behind her new full-length collection of poetry, "Cradling Monsoons."


Nebraskan poet Barbara Schmitz speaks at UNO

E.J. Free CONTRIBUTOR Barbara Schmitz always wanted to be a writer. Now known as the Poet of Highway 81, Schmitz has lived and worked in Norfolk, Nebraska,...

Tea Tree

The pungent, stinging stench of tea tree oil diffuses rapidly in the stale air of the cramped apartment. I study the little bits of stray matter highlighted by the ray of sun beaming through the window, imagining them choking and coughing on scent. Is it possible to die from a smell? It's supposed to kill lice with its antibacterial properties; does that go for all insects? I'm going to have to Google that. The steady hiss of the shower abruptly shuts off. I hear whistling and the vinyl snap of the shower curtain being flung open, and then the slap of wet feet hitting the linoleum floor. He must have shoved the bathmat against the door again.


Award-winning illustrator speaks about his work at the Joslyn

Chris Raschka had a monumental decision to  make. He could either go to medical school, which would mean closing his sketch books for the next 10 years, or he could take a leap of faith into an art career.