Two UNO professors to discuss transgender science, sociology at tonight’s Science Cafe

Two professors at the University of Nebraska at Omaha will lead a discussion about the science and sociology of transgender at tonight's Science Café, a...

UNMC gives employees incentives to carpool, walk, bus or bike to work

The University of Nebraska Medical Center and its clinical partner, Nebraska Medicine, rolled out a new transportation plan this week to encourage employees to avoid...

New study reveals hidden risks behind smoking hookah

By Nathan Stephenson, Contributor Hookah lounges are popular destinations among 18- to 20-year-olds as they are too young to drink at bars, but too old to stay...

It’s not “just stretching:” How I turned my New Year’s resolution into a lifestyle

By Kamrin Baker ONLINE REPORTER When you go to Build-A-Bear Workshop to, well, build a bear, you are instructed to pick a fabric heart halfway through...

You, Ellen Forney, & Me: An insight to mental illness offered through a graphic...

Rachel Luck CONTRIBUTOR “It was a relief to discover that aiming for a balanced life doesn’t mean succumbing to a boring one,” Ellen Forney writes in...

Scott Conference Center to house Nebraska Center for Preparedness Education’s 13th symposia in June

The Nebraska Center for Preparedness Education will host its 13th Annual Preparedness Symposium Series in April, May and June in six Nebraska cities. UNO's Scott...

UNO researchers speak at autism conference

Asperger's Syndrome, or AS, is a common condition part of a larger subset of developmental disorders collectively known as the autism spectrum. Individuals who have AS are often very intelligent and have focused and narrowly defined interests, but have difficulty understanding and interpreting social cues, such as tone of voice and body language. Often they seem aloof, uncaring or even rude, when in reality they simply don't understand. They must be taught the social skills that their typically developing peers learn naturally, which can be a laborious process.


Study reveals why we eat sugar under stress

Researchers have discovered that the reason we eat sugar while stressed is because sugar reduces cortisol, the stress hormone. Out of 19 volunteers, eight...