Tags Posts tagged with "Presidential Election"

Presidential Election

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Photo Courtesy of Smallville Wikki

Jeff Turner
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
DISCLAIMER.THE TOPICS AND ISSUES COVERED IN THIS EDITION ARE NOT REAL NEWS.
… HAPPY APRIL FOOLS DAY.

The 2020 election had more twists and turns than anyone in the media would have ever seen coming. First, there was the announcement that President Trump would get primaried by a relatively unknown entrepreneur from Gotham City. People didn’t even know where Gotham was, and are still sure. Reports place it somewhere between Seattle and Portland.

Bruce Wayne is young, charismatic, richer and his record showed that he was generally better at business than President Trump. He took the lead quickly. (Ted Cruz was also in the race too, but he didn’t last very long. He did however, take home the Guinness World Record for longest time crying like a little baby during his concession speech.)

The Democrats were equally chaotic. A record breaking number of 25 candidates were in the Democratic primary. Included were ex-pected choices like New York Senator Kristen Gillibrand, California Senator Kamala Harris, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren and Minnesota Senator Al Franken. None lasted long.

The incoming candidates were eclectic to say the least, including disgraced comedian Bill Cosby, campaigning on loosening up regulations on sex crimes, along with Kim Kardashian, who had to run after she was forced to ground husband Kanye West for refusing to clean his room, and Vermont Senator Robo-Bernie Sanders.

“I want to make robotic enhancements accessible to everyone, they are really cool and I can shoot laser out of my eyes. This is the major theme of my new campaign, giving everyone laser beam robot eyes, and not just the top 1 percent of the top 1 percent!” Sanders said in an interview.

It got stranger, President John F. Kennedy ran for president again.

“I was saved at the last minute, and taken to live on an island with Kurt Cobain, John Lennon and Tupac. They’re rad dudes. Lots of babes there.”

The other Kennedy’s had mixed feeling about his return.

“I-i-i-i-i-i-i watched you die” muttered former ambassador Caroline Kennedy as she rocked back and forth in a fetal position.

“I was going to run for president this cycle, now what am I going to do?” said annoyed Massachusetts Representative Joe Kennedy.

Kennedy wasn’t the only former president returning. There was scandal when the reanimated corpse of former President Franklin Roosevelt entered the race. There were rumors that former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton used dark magic to revive him.

“Me? Dark magic?” Clinton laughed disingenuously. She then awkwardly dougied out of the room before any more questions could be asked. It was not easy, as she had an inexplicable mechanical arm for her right arm and a mechanical leg for her left leg.

The rumors went unproved.

It was a chaotic primary, with Kardashian accusing Cosby of trying to roofie her, he then had to withdraw.
“That is unacceptable. You must lay the moves on the ladies like a gentleman,” responded President Kennedy, who was later seen out with Mrs. Kardashian.

The winner of the primary, was re-animated President Roosevelt. He still had it. Bruce Wayne, like-wise, won on the Republican end. Zombie FDR nominated Hillary Clinton as his Vice-President.

“No, I am not pulling the strings, here!” Clinton later yelled to a sup-porter at a rally.

Wayne nominated former Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels, as he realized he could unite the party.

“I’m just fascinated by Bruce’s work ethic, I think he could actually do some good for the country, I truly admire the man” the Governor later responded.

The election was hot, with President Roosevelt drawing strong hints that Bruce Wayne had elicit ties to the Gotham vigilante Batman, which remained unproven. He even ran an ad with someone who claimed to be Batman’s archnemesis, The Joker…but it was the Jared Leto Joker so the ad tanked.

Roosevelt appeared to lead in the polls, before Bruce Wayne pulled a surprising sweep, taking the Presidency. Former President Roosevelt died before he could make his concession speech while Clinton locked herself in her hotel room.

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Election_Day_GraphicThe Gateway team will be bringing you live election updates-check back often on this page throughout the day. Newer posts will be closer to the top of the page. Be sure to follow us on twitter and check out our Storify of today’s events. 

12:00 a.m.
FINAL POLLS IN THE NATION HAVE CLOSED IN THE WESTERN ISLANDS OF ALASKA

DISTRICT 2 HOUSE: With 62%% reported, Don Bacon leads with 49%. Brad Ashford is in second place with 48%. Libertarian candidate Steven Laird trails behind with 3%.

11:30 p.m.
NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton is projected to win Nevada for 6 electoral votes.

11:15 p.m.
NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Donald Trump is projected to win Iowa for 6 electoral votes.

11:00 p.m.
POLLS CLOSE IN MOST OF ALASKA

NEBRASKA DEATH PENALTY: Nebraska has voted to restore the death penalty.

NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Trump is projected to win Florida for 29 electoral votes and Georgia for 16 electoral votes.

NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton is projected to win Washington for 12 electoral votes.

10:30 p.m.
NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Trump has been projected to win North Carolina for 15 electoral votes.

NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton has been projected to win Oregon for 7 electoral votes.

DISTRICT 2 HOUSE: With 55.2%% reported, Brad Ashford leads with 49.1%. Don Bacon is in second place with 47.9%. Libertarian candidate Steven Laird trails behind with 3%.

10 p.m.
POLLS CLOSE IN SEVERAL STATES: Polls have closed in California, the northern tip of Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii.

NEBRASKA DEATH PENALTY: At 37.7% reporting, Retain has stretched out the lead at 54.8% against Repeal’s 45.4%

DISTRICT 2 HOUSE: With 51.4%% reported, Brad Ashford leads with 50%. Don Bacon is in second place with 47%. Libertarian candidate Steven Laird trails behind with 3%.

NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton has been projected to win Colorado for 9 electoral votes, California for 55 electoral votes and Hawaii for 4 electoral votes.

FROM THE UNO COMMUNITY: 

UNO Student Louie Wilson watches on as the results roll in. Louie said he is a bit nervous about what the results are right now because Clinton is behind. “Republicans are usually ahead at this point. So I still have high hopes,” Wilson said.
UNO Student Louie Wilson watches on as the results roll in. Louie said he is a bit nervous about what the results are right now because Clinton is behind. “Republicans are usually ahead at this point. So I still have high hopes,” Wilson said. Photo by Jared Kennedy/The Gateway

9:45 p.m.
NEBRASKA DEATH PENALTY: At 25.4% reported, retain barely leads at 50.5%, repeal is close behind with 49.7%. (Reminder: If retain wins, the referendum blocking the death penalty will remain in Nebraska. If repeal wins, the referendum will be removed)

DISTRICT 2 HOUSE: With 44% reported, Brad Ashford leads with 50.5%. Don Bacon is in second place with 46.6%. Libertarian candidate Steven Laird trails behind with 2.9%.

NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Trump has been projected to win Ohio for 18 electoral votes.

NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton has been projected to win Virginia for 13 electoral votes.

9:15 p.m.
NEBRASKA DEATH PENALTY: At 25.4% reported, retain barely leads at 50.5%, repeal is close behind with 49.7%. (Reminder: If retain wins, the referendum blocking the death penalty will remain in Nebraska. If repeal wins, the referendum will be removed)

DISTRICT 2 HOUSE: With 44% reported, Brad Ashford leads with 50.5%. Don Bacon is in second place with 46.6%. Libertarian candidate Steven Laird trails behind with 2.9%.

NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Trump has been projected to win Missouri for 10 electoral votes.

NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton has been projected to win New Mexico for 5 electoral votes.

9:00 p.m.
POLLS CLOSE IN SEVERAL STATES: Polls have closed in Iowa, most of Idaho, Utah, Nevada, and Montana

NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Trump has been projected to win Louisiana for 8 electoral votes and Montana for 3 electoral votes.

NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton has been projected to win Connecticut for 7 electoral votes

8:15 p.m.
NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Trump has been projected to win in Texas for 38 electoral votes and Arkansas for 6 electoral votes.

8:00 p.m.
POLLS CLOSE IN SEVERAL STATES: Polls have closed in New York, Minnesota, the western half of South Dakota, Nebraska, the southwestern corner of North Dakota, the northwestern corner of Michigan, Colorado, Louisiana, New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Trump has been projected to win Wyoming for 3 electoral votes, North Dakota for 3 electoral votes, South Dakota for 3 electoral votes, Nebraska for 3 out of their 5 possible electoral votes, and Kansas for 6 electoral votes.

NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton has been projected to win New York for 29 electoral votes.

7:30 p.m.
ARKANSAS: Polls have closed in Arkansas.

NEW TRUMP PROJECTIONS: Trump has been projected to win Alabama for 9 electoral votes and South Carolina for 9 electoral votes.

FLORIDA: The lead continues to bounce back and forth between Clinton and Trump.

7:00 p.m.

POLLS CLOSE IN SEVERAL STATES: Polls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, the western panhandle of Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, most of Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, most of North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, the eastern half of South Dakota, Tennessee and most of Texas.

NEW CLINTON PROJECTED WINS: Clinton has been projected to win Illinois for 20 electoral votes, District of Columbia for 3 electoral votes, Maryland for 10 electoral votes, Delaware for 3 electoral votes, New Jersey for 14 electoral votes, Massachusetts for 11 electoral votes and Rhode Island for 4 electoral votes.

NEW TRUMP PROJECTED WINS: Trump has been projected to win Tennessee for 11 electoral votes, Mississippi for 6 electoral votes and Oklahoma for 7 electoral votes.

6:30 p.m.
POLLS CLOSE IN SEVERAL STATES: Polls have closed in North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia.

FLORIDA: With 36% reporting, Clinton leads with 49.2%, Trump follows close behind with 48%.

WEST VIRGINIA: Trump is projected to win the state for 5 electoral votes.

6:15 p.m.
FIRST PROJECTED WINS: Trump is projected to take Indiana with 11 electoral votes and Kentucky with 8 electoral votes. Clinton is projected to take Vermont with 3 electoral votes.

6:00 p.m.
POLLS CLOSE IN SEVERAL STATES: Polling has closed in Georgia, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, the rest of Indiana, the western half of Kentucky and most of Florida.

INDIANA: With 6% reporting, Trump leads with 65%, Clinton has 31% and Johnson trails with 3.9%

KENTUCKY: With 7% reporting, Trump leads with 64%, Clinton has 30%, Johnson has 2.7% and Stein has .6%

5:00 p.m.
KENTUCKY AND INDIANA: The first polls in the country have officially closed.  Polling stations have closed in parts of Kentucky and Indiana. Both states also have polling stations that do not close until 6 p.m. CST.

12:00 p.m.
GUAM:  Hillary Clinton has been announced as the winner of Guam’s 2016 straw poll.  Clinton received 71% of the vote. This result has no official impact on the election, as Guam does not hold any members in the Electoral College. However, the island territory has correctly chosen the winning candidate every year since 1980 when the straw poll was created, barring 1996 when a typhoon disrupted the election day voting.

Voting Today? Here’s some helpful information:

  • Omaha Metro is giving free bus rides to polling stations from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. today. Check out the Omaha Metro website for more information.
  • Voting in Douglas county? Get the polling station information you need here. [NOTE: POLLS IN DOUGLAS COUNTY ARE CLOSED]
  • Voting in Council Bluffs? Get polling station information you need here. [NOTE: POLLS IN COUNCIL BLUFFS ARE CLOSED]
  • Voting in Sarpy county? Get polling station information you need here. [NOTE: POLLS IN SARPY COUNTY ARE CLOSED]
  • Have questions about what will be on your ballot? Get more information here.

 

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Photo Courtesy of huffingtonpost.com
Photo Courtesy of huffingtonpost.com

Gabreal Belcastro
CONTRIBUTOR

Every four years, two candidates dominate the airwaves as they run for the highest office in the United States. These two candidates have, historically, been from one of two camps, either Democratic or Republican. Yet every election cycle, some 3 million people cast votes for candidates whose names don’t have a (D) or an (R) beside them and are told each election that they have wasted their vote. This could not be further from the truth.

In the common lexicon, a “wasted vote” is one that is not cast for one of the two primary candidates. In reality, a “wasted vote” is one that does not count substantively towards representation. After all, votes are cast in the hopes of electing a leader, and if that candidate is not elected, then the vote has, ultimately, served no purpose.

There is no second place prize for presidential elections, so votes for the losing candidate will ultimately be worthless.

Why are third party candidates singled out in this? Simply, because their chances of election are lower.

Plurality, or “first-past-the-post” voting systems like our own foster the growth of a two party system by polarizing voters in two distinct majority groups in order to most effectively duel with the other for representation. This means that two parties are created and sustained largely by cultivating a feeling of fear or animosity towards the other side. One only needs to tune in to the mudslinging political ads every election year for proof of this phenomenon.

In this way, we can see how voting for a third party seems to stoke the flames; third party candidates belong to neither group, and votes for them do not count for either Republican nor Democratic candidates, and so pundits, activists, and politicians concerned about their party’s support will often demonize third party candidates to attempt to scare voters back into their camp.

This, however, is directly at odds with the principles of democracy.

When a pundit says that Jill Stein is taking votes away from Hillary Clinton, they are insinuating that those voting for the Green Party nominee would have otherwise voted for Clinton had Stein not have run. This line of argument is oft repeated in regards to the election of 2000 wherein Ralph Nader allegedly cost Al Gore the election.

This argument, however, assumes a number of things. First, it assumes that those who voted for Nader would have otherwise voted for Gore, which is not necessarily true. Second, it assumes that those who voted for Nader still would have voted at all had he not run under the Green ticket and “spoiled” the election. Lastly, it assumes that popular political opinions are only valuable if they culminate in the election of a candidate.

This line of thinking would continue by saying that people need not bother voting for the candidate they most agree with; instead, they should vote for whomever least disturbs their conscience. This is a terrible way to run a republic.

Hillary Clinton is not entitled to votes cast for Jill Stein. Donald Trump, not entitled to votes for Gary Johnson. Support for these two candidates this election cycle, such as support for Ralph Nader in 2000, and Ross Perot’s in 1992, reflects a portion of the voting population dissatisfied with the binary choices presented to them by the political establishment and the government at large in the contemporary United States.

To say this election is too precious a time for a protest vote entirely misses the point of the democratic process; voting should not be a practice of damage control rooted in fear, it is an opportunity to voice an opinion and have a say in how your country is run.

The only way the stranglehold of Republicans and Democrats in our electoral system can be broken is by empowering the third parties that more adequately represent the will of the people. Though the popular vote will not get a presidential candidate elected, if the Libertarian or Green candidates are able to garner just 5 percent of the popular vote this November (just 6.5 million out of a projected 131 million voters) their parties would qualify as “minor parties,” ensuring their party’s place on every ballot in the country come 2020, as well as offer them federal money towards campaigning and primaries.

Pragmatically, any vote for a losing candidate is a wasted vote. On principle, however, any vote cast for a candidate a voter doesn’t agree with is wasted as well. So whether you’re for Johnson/Weld, Stein/Baraka, or McMullin and whatever his running mate’s name is, it’s important that everyone vote with their conscience this election cycle.

Voting for the lesser of two evils only incentivizes more evil in Washington and if nothing else, at least in you’ll be able to shrug your shoulders a year from now and say “don’t look at me, I voted for the Aleppo guy.”

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Screen Shot 2016-10-03 at 5.23.13 PM

Gabreal Belcastro
CONTRIBUTOR

Let us imagine a country where two nearly identical political parties take turns dominating their nation’s government; where public approval of the legislative body frequently slips into the single digits; where riots, protests and demonstrations are increasingly the focus of media outlets around the globe. This nation’s two parties, fearful of any shift in public opinion, create laws, set guidelines and establish agencies with the sole purpose of ensuring their unquestioned supremacy. This state, one may well imagine, must exist somewhere in the Middle East. Does it sound like a country in Sub Saharan Africa, struggling with their transition into democracy? Perhaps it is some small, Post-Soviet state, unable to completely part ways with authoritarian habits. This country is none of these. It is, in fact, the United States.

The election of 2016 has been arguably the most chaotic, dubious and downright shocking event of American politics in recent memory. We have two candidates running with the lowest favorability ratings of any in history and yet, somehow, American voters are only going to hear these two voices on the debate stage. Surely America has produced other candidates worthy of our attention. To quote the painfully ironic title of The Twilight Zone’s premier episode: “Where is Everybody?”

Indeed, more than two candidates are running for president. At last count, three parties other than Republicans and Democrats will have their tickets appear on more than 20 state ballots come November, and one of these will appear on all 50. Libertarian Governor Gary Johnson and his running mate Governor Bill Weld are currently polling between eight and 13 percent (when they are included in polls), which represents, on the low end, some 1.2 million voters and will be on every ballot nationwide. The Libertarians have also polled upwards of 31 percent among registered independents and upwards of 36 percent in a poll of military members.

So why won’t the governors be on the debate stage? Simply because they failed to meet the Commission on Presidential Debates’ arbitrarily defined threshold of 15 percent in selected national polls. The same shortfall is true of Green Party nominee Dr. Jill Stein who has polled between two and five percent, a number which is still representative of several hundred thousand potential voters.

The Commission on Presidential Debates, which is comprised entirely of Republican and Democratic party members, has thus far shielded their two respective candidates from unwanted competition, stacking the deck against American voters who deserve to know about more than two of their options this November.

A debate featuring four or five different points of view would doubtlessly be more productive and representative of the American electorate than only two, and in a time when nearly half of all voters do not identify with either major party, the lack of intellectual diversity we have received from candidates in recent years is both unfair and insulting.

In light of the sheer disdain, vast swaths of the public have for the two leading candidates, it is imperative that the forthcoming debates be made more inclusive lest the American public begin to lose whatever faith is left in their government.

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