Americans have a right to know

Over 30 years ago, President Nixon changed the way the people of the United States view the government. It became apparent that the word of a government official isn't always trustworthy. In the 1970s, this was a disgrace and the people didn't stand for it.  The media exposed the Watergate Scandal and those involved were ashamed. Nixon was impeached, and ultimately resigned from office.
In the 1990s, President Clinton faced allegations of a sex scandal in the White House. Accused of an affair with a White House intern, he told the country a lie that forever stained his career. Although a bill of impeachment was brought before Congress, it never passed, and Clinton remained in office until the end of his term.
Despite the obvious immorality of the lie he told, Clinton's reputation remained in good shape with many Americans. They stood behind the idea that his sexual relationships were none of the public's business.
 


Online activist, Aaron Swartz, who committed suicide, will be an e-martyr

A lot of people have heard about Aaron Swartz in the past week, but his death really wasn't about Reddit.  In fact, his death is far more than the death of a single person, but almost as a martyr for a cause.  This cause is referred to in many ways, but perhaps "open Internet" is the best.
 


Finally, some common sense when it comes to gun control

President Barack Obama has finally done it. He has confronted the National Rifle Association's bullying machine. Whether or not his words spoken during his gun violence speech last Wednesday will be met with congressional action, President Obama has accomplished something great.
 


Point Blank

Another day in America, another gun crime.
Last month, barely a week before Christmas, the nation was shocked and horrified when a young man armed to the teeth with semi-automatic weapons blasted his way into an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., then proceeded to shoot and kill 20 children and seven teachers.  
The killing spree ended when the police showed up and the gunman took his own life.
In the weeks that followed, we were treated to almost daily reports of gun-related crimes and violence from around the nation.  
This should come as no surprise; in 2009 the United States ranked among the top ten nations with the most firearm-related deaths, with 10.2 per 100,000 people.
 


Resolve to fix the messes we’ve created

Sick of hearing about the "fiscal cliff" yet?  Buckle down, because it's not going away. Instead of accomplishing anything, Congress merely delayed the decision for two months.
Sick of hearing how many Cabinet nominations will probably be approved, but only after tons of posturing and aggression?
Americans have already placed their approval rating of Congress somewhere around 18 percent, according the most recent Gallup poll.
This is almost twice the rating it previously dropped to. Just goes to show just how poorly Americans see the state of our Congress.
We can all sit back and blame them for everything, but maybe it's time to take a look in the mirror.
 


Does media coverage focus too much on gunmen responsible?

Jack the Ripper: a legend wrapped in grizzly true events, which led to the deaths of at least five women.
No guns were involved, just senseless brutality in which even the police were taunted with letters and bits of body parts.
 The papers gave him massive coverage, and any paper in England not covering him at the time would have been considered behind.
 


Dreams deserve dignity, not deportation

One of the pressing issues facing the presidential candidates this election is how they will handle the nation's immigration problems.


Fairness irrelevant to Penn State penalties

Last month the NCAA announced unprecedented sanctions against Penn State and the Nittany Lions, including a $60 million fine and a 4-year postseason ban in response to the child sexual abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.