Another year of change

The end is near.


Victims of rape should be supported, not dismissed

Two weeks ago, at an Indiana Senate debate, Eric Turner, Republican state representative, delivered comments that angered many. While discussing an amendment to an anti-abortion bill that would allow women whose pregnancy is the result of rape or incest to undergo the procedure, he implied that women who want an abortion could simply lie about being a victim.


Losing the future

In a column I wrote last July titled "Education is the key to the future." I commented on the financial problems faced by states and municipalities and the measures local governments were taking to clean up their fiscal houses.  Among the options being considered at the time were cuts to education spending from elementary to higher education.


Three ways to improve UNO

With student elections coming up March 8, it's high time some critical changes took place at this school.


The end of empires

In 1989 when the Berlin Wall came down, the world celebrated the birth of a new order. For nearly 70 years, the Soviet Union dominated half of Europe and spread the ideology of totalitarian communism throughout the world. Its empire extended across the world, influencing governments through its military and diplomatic power in Africa, Asia and Central America.


If you aren’t planning on voting…

I don't know whether to hug them or smack them.  I'm talking about the 11,000 Omahans who, according to a recent report in the Omaha World-Herald, signed the recall petitions but didn't vote in the actual election on Jan. 25.


Apocalypse Snow

We all saw it coming.  Icy road conditions, subzero temperatures and dangerous wind chills were predicted for the start of the week. By Monday, it was clear that travel the next day would be difficult at best. By 9 p.m., every primary and secondary school and some colleges in the Omaha area had canceled school for Tuesday, and many daycares shut down in anticipation of dangerous road conditions.


Omaha made the right choice

Last Tuesday, while the rest of the nation was watching the president's State of the Union address, the city of Omaha headed to the voting booths to decide whether Mayor Jim Suttle should stay in office.  The final tally was very close - a margin of just two percent decided he should keep his job. There's a lesson there: if you don't think your vote counts, think again.