Journalism professor discusses his book on Native American culture

Hugh Reilly, associate professor in UNO's School of Communications, spoke Feb. 15 at a seminar for the Center for Great Plains Studies at UNL about The Great Sioux Uprising in 1862, a topic that inspired his book, "Bound to Have Blood: Frontier Newspapers and the Plains Indian Wars."


Sarah Mckinstry-Brown: Cradling Monsoons

Sarah Mckinstry-Brown is a poet, mother and wife.  She is one woman balancing a monsoon of tasks. Mckinstry-Brown explained that life's gifts and blessings can become cumbersome, such is the nature of life.  This is the inspiration behind her new full-length collection of poetry, "Cradling Monsoons."


Get attached to Rainbow Rowell’s ‘Attachments’

Oh, the forbidden office romance. So exciting. So taboo.


What Dr. Who taught me about futile dreams

I will never be a 900-year-old Time Lord

Oh, the nature of a futile dream.

Nor will David Tennant or Matt Smith - sorry, I mean "The Doctor"

Ever love me like he loved Rose or Sara Jane.


Midwest Poetry Vibe

The National Council of Negro Women hosted the Midwest Poetry Vibe in the Milo Bail Student Center Ballroom on Wed. Nov. 3 from 7 to 10 p.m. The event was open-mic style and presented live music from Omaha R&B band The Last Few.


John Green’s latest book delves into mental illness

Madeline Miller SENIOR REPORTER “Turtles All the Way Down” is a difficult book to read. It is not difficult because it is poorly written or filled...

Brevity

We should have recognized the omens the night we cruised into Santa Fe. When snowdrifts obscured the friendly signs and covered the windows of strangers that would normally welcome visitors like us; when blizzard-like conditions caused every automobile to creep along the interstate in fear that an overcorrection of the wheel might fatefully crush metal and bones upon impact with red rock encased in ice; when we finally arrived at our hotel room, exhausted after twelve hours on the road, and it appeared as though a drug dealer or wild animal had inhabited the place for months -- crooked picture frames and dank, mustard-colored sheets left behind as ruffled remnants of his nightly terrors, induced by bad trips, bad dreams, or bad luck.


Award-winning illustrator speaks about his work at the Joslyn

Chris Raschka had a monumental decision to  make. He could either go to medical school, which would mean closing his sketch books for the next 10 years, or he could take a leap of faith into an art career.